Accessibility

Suggested Readings:

Fichten, C.S., Heiman, T., Havel, S., Jorgensen, M., Budd, J., & King, L. (2016). Sustainability of disability-related services in Canada and Israel: Will the real universal design please stand up? Exceptionality Education International, 26(1), 19-35.

 

Fichten, C.S., Asuncion, J.V., Barile, M., Ferraro, V., & Wolforth, J. (2009). Accessibility of e-learning and computer and information technologies for students with visual impairments in postsecondary education. Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, 103(9), 543-557.

 

Fullarton, S., & Duquette, C. (2016). Experiences of students with learning disabilities in Ontario universities: A case study. International Journal of Special Education, 31(1), 55-66.

 

Kupferman, S.I., & Schultz, J.C. (2015). Supporting students with psychiatric disabilities in postsecondary education: Important knowledge, skills, an attitudes.Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 28(1), 25-40.

 

McGuire, J.M. (2014). Universally accessible instruction: Oxymoron or opportunity? Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 27(4), 387-398.

 

Meyers, M., MacDonald, J.E., Jacquard, S., & Mcneil, M. (2014). (dis)Ability and postsecondary education: One woman’s experience. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 27(1), 73-87.

 

Novakovic, A., & Ross, D.E. (2015). College student for a day: A transition program for high school students with disabilities. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 28(2), 229-234.

 

Walker, L. (2016). Impact of academic support centers on students with disabilities in postsecondary institutions. Learning Assistance Review, 21(1), 81-92.

 

Watt, S., Vejoczki, S., Voros, G., Vine, M., Fenton, N., & Tarkowski, J. (2014). Lecture capture: an effective tool for universal instructional design? The Canadian Journal for Higher Education, 44(2), 1-29.

 

Zarifa, D., Walters, D., & Seward, B. (2015). The earnings and employment outcomes of the 2005 cohort of Canadian postsecondary graduates with disabilities. Canadian Review of Sociology, 52(4), 343-376.

 

 

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